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ARID ZONE RESEARCH INSTITUTE

UMERKOT, Sindh, Pakistan

 

OBJECTIVE/ FOCUS
Arid Zone Research Station at Umerkot was established in 1981-82 as a part of Arid Zone Research Institute with head quarters at Quetta during 1982. An area of 85.46 ha was acquired from Government of Sindh for ``establishing the research station. The station was established for carrying out research on dry-land agriculture and improvement of rangeland including sand dune fixation in Thar Desert. During first 10 years, the station has been developed with basic infrastructure including staff residences, open wells, some farm machinery and research farm with sizeable plantation of range grasses, shrubs and trees etc. A comprehensive vegetation survey and socio-economic survey of the Thar area has also been conducted to identity constraints at farm level.

 

Thar a sandy arid desert, comprising of about 22,000 sq. kilometers is located on longitude 69 71 10, latitude 24 25 10. The Thar is situated on the eastern side of Sindh province bordering with Rajhistan India. The major portion of the area has high sand dunes with low valleys of fertile lands in which cropping is carried out on rainwater. Soil of Thar is generally loamy sand with 2-6% clay, 1.5 to 3.5% silt, 10-30% coarse sand and 65-80% fine sand underlain by rocky strata at few to several meters depth. The climate of the area has extremes. It differs considerably into two portions of the district. In the irrigated western portion, it is less hot in summer and less cold in winter as compared to the eastern desert area. The summer temperatures are considerably lowered by constantly blowing of southwestern breeze from the sea. The Thar area has a tropical desert climate. April, May and June are the hottest months; the mean maximum and minimum temperature during summer are 41oC and 24oC respectively. December, January and February are the coldest months experiencing maximum and minimum temperatures of 28oC and 9oC respectively. Rainfall varies from year to year. Most of rain falls in the monsoon months (between June through September). Annual rainfall of the area is about 172 mm.

 

Livestock is the mainstay of the people of Thar. About 76% of the human population is engaged in raising livestock and related activities. The former Tharparkar district has two distinct areas. The irrigated area on the western side known as “ Parkar” and the desert area to the east, which is known as “Thar”. The eastern Nara Canal is the line of the demarcation of the two regions i.e., irrigated and non-irrigated and further east at Umerkot for example, the fusion of the two is clearly marked. The Thar region is mostly desert. It consists of barren tracts of sand dunes covered with thorny bushes. The only hills are in the extreme southeast corner of Nangarparkar Taluka. These are known as “Karunjhar” hills. These are about 20km in length and attain a height of about 300m. These are covered with sparse jungle and pasture and give rise to two perennial spring as well as temporary streams caused after rains.

 

Wheat, Cotton, Castor seed, Maize, Sugarcane, Rice, Mango, Banana, Rapeseed and Mustard and Vegetables including Chillies are the main agricultural crops grown in irrigated areas. Whereas Millet, Guar, Mungbeans and Sesame are the main crops grown under rain-fed condition in year of good rainfall.

 

MAJOR AREAS OF RESEARCH THRUSTS

  1. To investigate, develop, adapt scientific technology for improving productivity per unit area of arid lands, per unit animal of range/livestock for sustained economic amelioration of rural/pastoral communities of such hitherto neglected regions and thereby improving the quality of life of common man.

  2. To investigate and evolve research and development models for the integrated development and production of appropriate crops, forages, fodder, fuel plants, range lands and range livestock.

  3. To train professionals, technical and farmer communities for creating the awareness of arid land resources, their problems and potentials and equip them with the latest technology for scientific improvement and management of vast arid lands of the area.

OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT PREFERABLY IN QUANTITATIVE TERMS

  • To establish a regional research capability under the leadership of Central Arid

  • Zone Research Institute to tackle the problems of arid/semi-arid agriculture of Thar and surrounding areas.

  • Develop techniques for the best land use in the arid region of Thar and adjoining irrigated belt of lower Sindh. Special emphasis will be given to the following aspects:

  • Identify constraints in the development of crop, livestock and socio-economic problems in the region.

  • Conduct research for finding solution to the Identified problems.

  • Collect and analyze the statistical data for the arid zones: To determine the economics of various enterprise mixes.
     

CURRENT RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

Water use Efficiency Improvement
   • Response of grafted Ber, Falsa, chiku with and with out Drip irrigation system.

   • Effect of Pitcher Irrigation on the growth and yield of vegetables. (Ribbed Gourd & Bitter Gourd).

   • Rainwater harvesting.
 

Productivity Improvement
   • Dry land farming on Millet, Guar, Sesamum Mung beans.
   • Utilization of underground water resources.

   • Mung bean, Millet, Sorghum.

   • National Uniform yield trial under cooperative Research Programme (MSM).
 

Range Management
  
• Silvi- Pastoral studies Lasurus Sindicus a local pasture grass will be grown with eight acacia species as fodder and forage.

   • Comparative study of Natural and introduced grass species for biomass and yield under Thar condition.

   • Evaluation, characterization and production of medicinal plants of Thar.

   • Collection of seed of all Desert species available for further propagation and desertification control.
 

Land and Water Resources Management
    • Effect of pitcher irrigation on the growth and yield of watermelon.

    • Response of grafted ber and falsa under drip irrigation in Thar Desert.

    • Rain water harvesting and agro meteorology.

    • Lysimeter farming for kitchen gardening in Thar Desert.
 

Crop Sciences
    • Introduction Of Bio-Diesel Plants (Jatropha Curcas, Castorbean and Sukh chain) IN Thar desert:

    • Evaluation of Rabi and Kharif dry land Crop. Rabi: Sesame, Chick pea and Barly Kharif: Sorghum, millet, maize, guar etc.
 

SALIENT RESEARCH, RESULTS / FINDINGS
Crop Science:
Introduction of Jatropha Curcass as a Bio-Diesel Plants in Thar Desrt

10,000 Jatropha plants has been raised at AZRI Farm in green house (polythene bags) as well as on open seed bed and also transferred nursery plants of Jatropha at farmers field near Chhore Cant.

 

Experiment of Bio fuel planted as different varieties of the Jatropha curcas such as Malaysia, India and Thailand varieties were planted as AZRI Farm. Two verities like Thailand and Malaysia showed good performance in case of plant height, no of leaves and branches as compared to Indian variety.

 

Detail is each parameter are in the table No.1

Varieties

Average

Height (cm)

No

of branches per plant

Canopy

(cm)

01. Thailand

91

12

121

02. Malaysian

81

7

93

03. Indian

61

4

47

 

Study on Bio Fuel plants Cultivated in Farmer Field Distt. Umerkot.
Ten acres plantations of Jatropha are completed at village Dr. Hafeez Halepoto near Umerkot. Plant to plant spacing is 10 x 10 and all the plants of Jatropha curcas Thailand variety showed good performance in case of height branches and leaves.
 

To Test High Yielding Variety of Caster Bean in Desert Condition
Four varieties of Castor bean (Viz. DS.30, Nangar parker, Mithi and local check) were planted under bio-fuel project. Data of caster been ie plant height canopy, and no of branches were recorded.
 

IMPROVEMENT IN WATER USE EFFICIENCY
Performance of Grafted Ber, and Chiku under Drip Irrigation
The experiment was conducted in order to assess the performance of the Grafted ber and Chiku. It has been observed from the experiment the growth and yield is satisfactory of Grafted ber and Chiku in the harsh condition of Thar desert. Grafted ber has produced average yield of 20.5 Kg/ Plant As well as plants are going towards the maturity; their water requirement is also increasing with the time. However some plants are died due to the attack of termite and new plants are replaced at their respective positions.
 

Effect of Pitcher Irrigation on the Growth and Yield of Vegetables (Gourds)

The experiment was carried out to asses the pitcher irrigation effect on the growth and yield of vegetable (gourd).Two sources of water (S1= Ground water & S2= Canal water), four irrigation methods (M1= Pitcher simple, M2= Pitchers with bottom painted with bitumen, M3= Pitchers wrapped with gunny bags, M4= Bucket irrigation) and three irrigation intervals (I1= 4 days, I2= 6 days, I3= 8days) were used in the study. It has been found that highest yield of gourd is obtained from the treatment number seventeen number 8.0 kg/pitcher followed by treatment seventeen 7.75 kg/pitcher. Highest water use efficiency is obtained from the treatment number eighteen 60.38 gram/liter/pitcher and followed by treatment number six 56.52 gram/liter/pitcher.

 

RAINWATER HARVESTING IN THAR DESERT
The data of rainfall recorded at AZRI Umerkot from inception of institute. The data of rainfall suggests rain in trios. Three years of good rainfall followed by three years of very poor rain, some times interrupted by heavy rainfall or poor rain due to some cyclone or weather change. This situation has created unpredictable agriculture and the area is always under low or high stress. Plantation of trees on large scale is the only answer and solution to this natural problem.
From 1981 till to date 13 years hyper aridity ( rain fall bellow 100 mm) 7 years arid (above 100mm bellow 300 mm) and 7 years above (300mm) . Rains fall highly unpredictable
 

INSTALLATION OF WIND MILL AT AZRI FARM
Wind mill is installed in the month of July 2008, under (ASPL-II) project. Technology is useful for water harvesting and saving electricity charges of water pumps. Initially working performance is well for the concerned area. Harvested water is consuming for drinking and irrigating to plants and crop planted on drip system.
 

C. RANGE MANAGEMENT:
SILVICULTURE OF DESERT FLORA
Seed of 16-desert flora such as trees, shrubs and grasses species were

collected from live herbarium of AZRI Umerkot for multi purpose of Thari farmers. Highest seed yield was obtained from Acacia ampliceps (Australian Babur) 4.0 kg/plant followed by callogonum poly gonoides (Phog) 3.0 kg/plant, Acacia stenophylla (Australian Babur) 2.0 kg/plant, Tecoma undulata (Rehero) 2.0 kg/plant & lowest seed yield was received from grasses like cenchrus biflorus (Bhurt) 0.2 kg/plant and Dactylotenium scindicum (Madhana Gass) 0.2 kg/plant. Detailed seed yield of 16-desert species in kg is given table 2.
 

Table No. 02. Silviculture of different trees, shrubs and grasses species.

S. No.

Botanical Name

Local Name

Yield in kg/plant

01

Acacia ampleceps

Australian babur

4.0

02

Colligonum polygonoides

Phog

3.0

03

Acacia stenophylla

Australian babur

2.0

04

Tecoma undulate

Rohero

2.0

05

Acacia parksonia

Villaeti babur

2.0

06

Prospis cineria

Kandi

1.0

07

Leuceena leuco cephalla

Ipilipil

1.0

08

Acacia jaquemanti

Bavri

1.0

09

Lasiurus sindicus

San

0.2

10

Panicum targidum

Murt

0.5

11

Panicum antidotale

Chumhole

0.4

12

Acacia Senegal

Khubat

1.0

13

Cenchrus biflorus

Bhurt

0.2

14

Dactylo tenium scindicum

Madhani gass

0.2

15

Albizia lebek

Sarinh

1.0

16

--

Sonjhro

0.25

 

2. COMPARATIVE BIOMASS STUDIES OF VARIOUS THAR PLANT SPECIES:

The experiment was carried out on the biomass of different plant species in the Thar. The data reveals that the highest dry matter yield was produced by Panicum turgidum (12.5 t. ha-1) and followed by Leptadenia spartium (11.0 t.ha)-.

 

The details are shown in table 3.
 

S. No.

Name of plant species

Local Name

Dry matter t.ha-1

 

01.

Lasiurus sindicus

(Sann)

8.15

 

02.

Panicum turgidum

(Murt)

12-50

 

03.

Panicum antidotale

(Chumhole)

9.56

 

04.

Cenchrus setigerus

(Modo Bhurt)

2.36

 

05.

Cenchrus biflorus

(Bhurt)

1.05

 

06.

Indigofera cordifolia

(Vaker)

0.80

 

07.

Citrullus colocynthis

(Tooh)

0.61

 

08.

Cyperus arenarius

(Vinjhal)

1.15

 

09.

Dactyloctanium segyptium

(Madhani ghass)

0.73

 

10.

Euphorbia clarkeana

(Khirwal)

4.05

 

11.

Elousine flagellifera

(Ghandir)

0.73

 

12.

Asparagus jacquemotii

(Sataro)

3.15

 

13.

Cenchrus ciliaris cv

(267)

4.31

 

14.

//             //        //

Biliola

5.75

 

15.

Cenchrus ciliaris cv

US Buffel

7.00

 

16.

//           //         //

Ghayanda

5.00

 

17.

Cenchrus pennisetiforms

(Bara dhaman)

8.30

 

18.

Aerva tomentosa

(Booh)

8.25

 

19.

Crotalaris bifaria

(Sinn gangli)

1.70

 

20.

Crotalaria burhia

(Sinn)

8.34

 

21.

Leptadenia spartium

(Khip)

11.00

 

22.

Heliotropium ramosissmum

(Khirson)

8.58

 

23.

Lycium europaeum

(Moraro)

7.17

 

24.

Calligonum polygonoides

(Phog)

9.56

 


3. EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT MEDICINAL PLANTS AT AZRI UMERKOT:
Experiment on medicinal plants: It was observed that maximum plant height and numbers of branches were recorded in commiphora mukul (Gugur) 136 cm and 80 branches followed by Aoevera (Areal) 58 cm and 21 branches and minimum height and branches were recorded from Cassia angustifolia (Sana Maki) 40 cm and 7 branches. In total 40 medicinal species are in programme most of species doing very well.

Table No. 04. Medicinal plants of the Thar desert.
 

S. No.

Name of plant species

Local Name

Dry matter t.ha-1

 

01.

Lasiurus sindicus

(Sann)

8.15

 

02.

Panicum turgidum

(Murt)

12-50

 

03.

Panicum antidotale

(Chumhole)

9.56

 

04.

Cenchrus setigerus

(Modo Bhurt)

2.36

 

05.

Cenchrus biflorus

(Bhurt)

1.05

 

06.

Indigofera cordifolia

(Vaker)

0.80

 

07.

Citrullus colocynthis

(Tooh)

0.61

 

08.

Cyperus arenarius

(Vinjhal)

1.15

 

09.

Dactyloctanium segyptium

(Madhani ghass)

0.73

 

10.

Euphorbia clarkeana

(Khirwal)

4.05

 

11.

Elousine flagellifera

(Ghandir)

0.73

 

12.

Asparagus jacquemotii

(Sataro)

3.15

 

13.

Cenchrus ciliaris cv

(267)

4.31

 

14.

//             //        //

Biliola

5.75

 

15.

Cenchrus ciliaris cv

US Buffel

7.00

 

16.

//           //         //

Ghayanda

5.00

 

17.

Cenchrus pennisetiforms

(Bara dhaman)

8.30

 

18.

Aerva tomentosa

(Booh)

8.25

 

19.

Crotalaris bifaria

(Sinn gangli)

1.70

 

20.

Crotalaria burhia

(Sinn)

8.34

 

21.

Leptadenia spartium

(Khip)

11.00

 

22.

Heliotropium ramosissmum

(Khirson)

8.58

 

23.

Lycium europaeum

(Moraro)

7.17

 

24.

Calligonum polygonoides

(Phog)

9.56

 


Source:  Books, review of literature and Unani Hakeems Live herbarium studies.
 

4. COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF DIFFERENT GRASSES FOR THEIR BIOMASS UNDER RAIN-FED CONDITIONS

Maximum green biomass was recorded from panicum turgidum (Murt) 13 t/ha followed by Lasiuras sindicus (San) 12 t/ha, cenchrus settigerus (Dhaman) 10 t/ha, Panicum antidotale (Chumhole) 8 t/ha respectively/ minimum green biomass was received by indigora cordifolia (Vakar) 2 t/ha and dactyl lotenium scindicum (Madhana gass) 4t/ha.
 

Table No. 05. Grasses species.
 

S. No.

Local Name

Botanical Name

Family

Human food

Forage

Others

01.

Vaker

Indigofera cordifolia

Papilionaceae

 

*

 

02.

San

Lasiurus scindicus

Graminae

 

*

 

03.

Murt

Panicum turgidum

Graminae

*

*

 

04.

Vinhal / Khabah

Cyperus arenarius

Cyperaceae

 

*

 

05.

Madhani ghas

Dactylotenium scindicum

Graminae

 

*

 

S. No.

Local Name

Botanical Name

Family

Human food

Forage

Others

06.

Ghandir

Elousine flagellifera

Graminae

 

*

(M)

07.

Koori (Punjawali)

Digitoria bicornis

Graminae

 

*

 

08.

Bhurt

Cenchrus biflorus

Graminae

*

*

(M)

09.

Modo Bhurt

Cenchrus setigerus

Graminae

 

*

 

10.

Guar

Cyamopsis testrognoloba

Papilionaceae

*

*

(M), Chemical Industry

11.

Bajri

Pennisetum tyhoides

 

*

*

(M)

12.

Dhaman (Local)

Cenchrus ciliaris

Graminae

 

*

 

13.

Dhaman (Imported)

Cenchrus ciliaris cv US Buffel

Graminae

 

*

 

14.

Dhaman (Imported)

Cenchrus ciliaris cv Ghayanda

Graminae

 

*

 

15.

Dhaman (Imported)

Cenchrus ciliaris cv Beliola

Graminae

 

*

 

16.

Dhaman (Imported)

Cenchrus ciliaris cv 267

Graminae

 

*

 

17.

Dhaman (Imported)

Cenchrus ciliaris cv Un Identified

Graminae

 

*

 

18.

Lumb

Aristida adscensionis

Graminae

 

*

 

19.

Chumhole

Panicum antidotale

Graminae

 

*

 

20.

Bara dhaman ghas

Cenchrus pennisetiformis

Graminae

 

*

 

 

S. No.

Local Name

Botanical Name

Family

Human food

Forage

Others

01.

Vaker

Indigofera cordifolia

Papilionaceae

 

*

 

02.

San

Lasiurus scindicus

Graminae

 

*

 

03.

Murt

Panicum turgidum

Graminae

*

*

 

04.

Vinhal / Khabah

Cyperus arenarius

Cyperaceae

 

*

 

05.

Madhani ghas

Dactylotenium scindicum

Graminae

 

*

 

S. No.

Local Name

Botanical Name

Family

Human food

Forage

Others

06.

Ghandir

Elousine flagellifera

Graminae

 

*

(M)

07.

Koori (Punjawali)

Digitoria bicornis

Graminae

 

*

 

08.

Bhurt

Cenchrus biflorus

Graminae

*

*

(M)

09.

Modo Bhurt

Cenchrus setigerus

Graminae

 

*

 

10.

Guar

Cyamopsis testrognoloba

Papilionaceae

*

*

(M), Chemical Industry

11.

Bajri

Pennisetum tyhoides

 

*

*

(M)

12.

Dhaman (Local)

Cenchrus ciliaris

Graminae

 

*

 

13.

Dhaman (Imported)

Cenchrus ciliaris cv US Buffel

Graminae

 

*

 

14.

Dhaman (Imported)

Cenchrus ciliaris cv Ghayanda

Graminae

 

*

 

15.

Dhaman (Imported)

Cenchrus ciliaris cv Beliola

Graminae

 

*

 

16.

Dhaman (Imported)

Cenchrus ciliaris cv 267

Graminae

 

*

 

17.

Dhaman (Imported)

Cenchrus ciliaris cv Un Identified

Graminae

 

*

 

18.

Lumb

Aristida adscensionis

Graminae

 

*

 

19.

Chumhole

Panicum antidotale

Graminae

 

*

 

20.

Bara dhaman ghas

Cenchrus pennisetiformis

Graminae

 

*

 

 

M- Medicine, F- Fuel (burning), T- Timber, H-Huts, SR- Soil Reclamation, O- Ornamental

 

5. STUDY ON LIVE HERBARIUM AT AZRI UMERKOT

Recorded plant height and breaches of desert flora in live Herbarium are as under:

Highest plant height was noted from Prosopis cineraria (Kandi) 14.25 ft. and no of branches 737 followed by Acacia jaquemontii (Bavri) 13.5 ft. and 1166 branches, Meliaindica (Neem) 12.5 ft. and 1957 branches, Zizyphus jujuba (Ber) 10.2 ft. and branches 267, Acacia Senegal (Khumbhat) 9.95 ft. and branches 1221, Tecoma unduleta 9 ft. branches 414, colligonium polygonoides (Phog) 7.9 ft. branches 207, Silvadora oleids (Jar) 7.5 ft. branches 131, Alevera (Arial) 7.5 ft. branches 141, Holoforacae 6.05 branches 190. Lowest height was recorded from Euphorbia caudicifolia (Thohar) 3.45 ft. branches 150.
 

6. MAINTENANCE OF POTTED NURSERY/ SEED COLLECTION OF LIVE HERBARIUM PLANTS
Raising and maintenance of tree/ shrubs potted nursery at Umerkot to grow multi purpose tree/ shrubs for different agroforestry and dry zone afforestation programme. Plants sampling of acacia ampleceps and seed of other grasses species was supplied to local peoples and army stations at Gadro and Khinsar. Kallar grass leptochloca fusca was also supplied for khinsar to utilize brackish water. Seed of different species i.e trees shrubs and grasses were collected from month of February to April 2011.
 

7. STUDY ON SAND DUNES STABILIZATION
104 different desert plant species were tested for sand dune stabilization which include Acacia ampliceps, Acacia stenophylla, Atriplex helimus, Eupharabia caiudicifolia, Salvadora persica, Aerutomen tosa, Leptadenia spartium prosopis cineraria, Acacia jaquemontii, Acacia Senegal, Calligonum polygonoides comiphora mukal, Acacia parknsonia and Ricinus communis.

 

WATER SAVING THROUGH MODERN TECHNIQUES:
    • Drip irrigation (Grafted ber, Phalsa and Chiku). Windmill will be installed.

    • Pitcher irrigation (Vegetables)

    • Soil and Water conservation techniques.
 

RANGE MANAGEMENT
    • Study on silvopastoral continued.

    • Study on medicinal plants.

    • Maintenance/Collection of Thar flora and further propagation to check wind erosion.
 

WATER USE EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT
    • Response of grafted Ber, Falsa, chiku with and with out Drip irrigation system.

    • Effect of Pitcher Irrigation on the growth and yield of vegetables. (Ribbed Gourd & Bitter Gourd).

    • Rainwater harvesting.
 

PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT
    • Dry land farming on Millet, Guar, Sesamum Mung beans.
    • Utilization of underground water resources.

    • Mung bean, Millet, Sorghum.

    • National Uniform yield trial under cooperative Research Programme (MSM).
 

RANGE MANAGEMENT
    • Silvi- Pastoral studies Lasurus Sindicus a local pasture grass will be grown with eight acacia species as fodder and forage.

    • Comparative study of Natural and introduced grass species for biomass and yield under Thar condition.

    • Evaluation, characterization and production of medicinal plants of Thar.

    • Collection of seed of all Desert species available for further propagation and desertification control.
 

LAND AND WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
    • Effect of pitcher irrigation on the growth and yield of watermelon.

    • Response of grafted ber and falsa under drip irrigation in Thar Desert.

    • Rain water harvesting and agro meteorology.

    • Lysimeter farming for kitchen gardening in Thar Desert.
 

CROP SCIENCES
Evaluation of Rabi and Kharif dry land Crop.

Rabi: Sesame, Chick pea and Barly

Kharif: Sorghum, millet, maize, guar etc.

National Uniform yield trial cooperative Research Programme (MSM).
 

RANGE SCIENCE
• Comparative studies of different grasses species for their biomass under rain fed area of Thar.

• Screening of different fodder trees on the forage yield.
• Salient Research, Results/Findings.
• Technologies Developed
1. Wind mill is installed under (ASPL-II) project. Technology is useful for water harvesting and saving electricity charges of water pumps. Initially working performance is well for the concerned area. Harvested water is consuming for drinking and irrigating to plants and crop planted on drip system.

2. Introduced PARC high yielding Millet variety Bajra Super-1 in Thar and irrigated belt of Umerkot and Sind under Cooperative Research Program on Maize, Sorghum and Millet.

3. Introduced PARC high yielding Sorghum variety Johar in Thar and irrigated belt of Umerkot and Sind under Cooperative Research Program on Maize, Sorghum and Millet.

4. Introduced drip irrigation system in Thar and Umerkot area.
• Research Project Completed
1. Cooperative Research Program on Maize, Sorghum and Millet completed in year

(2011).

2. (ASPL-II) project completed in year (2008-09).

3. Development of demonstration sides for high density mango orchards with dwarf and semi dwarf varieties.dis continued due to financial constraints.

4. Establishment of demonstration orchards of pear at high density planting (HDP) and modern management practice. Discontinued due to financial constraints.
 

On going projects:
1. RADP sub project. Cultivation of bio fuel plants on marginal lands in Pakistan.

2. Seed production of multipurpose trees and forage species.

3. Use of alternative energy sources for pumping water in agriculture.
 

Collaborative research activities
SARC Karachi, AZRC Quetta, TTI, Tandojam and Ditrict forest office Umerkot.

Advisory services/Technical Assistance
Progressive growers and different NGO,S located in Thar, Umerkot and surroundings.

 

Resource Person:

 

Dr. Yar Muhammad Memon PSO/ Director

azri_uk@hotmail.com

Dr. Hamz Ali Samoon

hamzsamoon@yahoo.com

 


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